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Unregistered 11-10-2015 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73627)
You got this job right after u graduated? What does an analyst do?

I was working in a similar almost-full-time role for about 2 years while I was studying.

I had a short break after I graduated, because I was working + studying the past few years. And I really wanted to do C&B + Consulting, so I was holding out. I got this about 3 months after finishing my finals.

I'll say my work revolves around looking at data, comparing data and then converting data A into data B so employees are on par with the market, simply put.

It's alot of excel work.

I mean, in a consultancy, the main business is to package up C&B Solutions for the client nicely and give it to them to implement.

MJDaisy 11-10-2015 11:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73619)
How to get into a specialist role? I heard others saying you need to work your way up prolly doing generalist role for ard 8 years first. Is it true?

Generalist =/= Specialist

8 years of Generalist work doesn't mean you are trained in benchmarking market salaries or building salary structures or doing job grading.

Read SOXA's and my replies. :)

Unregistered 12-10-2015 11:06 PM

at the end of the day its the $$$ that counts, dun really care what the co. like to call u. dun call urself a hr spec when u cant even make 200k a year. same with those who call themselves bankers or principal engineers or subject matter experts, make sure u have the market worth to back it up.

MJDaisy 13-10-2015 01:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73684)
at the end of the day its the $$$ that counts, dun really care what the co. like to call u. dun call urself a hr spec when u cant even make 200k a year. same with those who call themselves bankers or principal engineers or subject matter experts, make sure u have the market worth to back it up.

True, but 200k is probably on the high end of the minimum to be a hr spec la.
I would say at 100k pa you would be starting to be a HR spec.

Don't be so downs on people la. We all have to work our way up. :)

But yeah, companies now like to over inflate job titles - Executive etc, not just in the HR sector. So have to read the JD very carefully. So many admin roles getting masked by big names. Banks can have BD execs but in reality they are just typical salespeople. Experience and knowłedge is very important to be a "specialist" in whichever field

Unregistered 13-10-2015 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MJDaisy (Post 73687)
True, but 200k is probably on the high end of the minimum to be a hr spec la.
I would say at 100k pa you would be starting to be a HR spec.

Don't be so downs on people la. We all have to work our way up. :)

But yeah, companies now like to over inflate job titles - Executive etc, not just in the HR sector. So have to read the JD very carefully. So many admin roles getting masked by big names. Banks can have BD execs but in reality they are just typical salespeople. Experience and knowłedge is very important to be a "specialist" in whichever field

100k is a joke to call oneself a specialist. that translates to hardly 6k+ monthly for most companies which is so common in many mncs/public sector. its not about looking down on people, its about being honest about where u stand.

i dun make 200k, but neither do i go about bs-ing people i am some sort of specialist in my field. i just say yes i am working on xxx in yyy department. not big cannon about being a specialist or subject expert in my field.

Unregistered 13-10-2015 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73701)
100k is a joke to call oneself a specialist. that translates to hardly 6k+ monthly for most companies which is so common in many mncs/public sector. its not about looking down on people, its about being honest about where u stand.

i dun make 200k, but neither do i go about bs-ing people i am some sort of specialist in my field. i just say yes i am working on xxx in yyy department. not big cannon about being a specialist or subject expert in my field.

I believe he meant 100k base, excluding bonuses and potential equity. That translate into 8k+ monthly on a 12 month base package. That appears reasonable.

6k+ does appear on the low end, but let's keep in mind there are many at this level who are aspiring specialists (eg. Junior HRBPs or AVP equivalent in a bank?), and it'll take time, experience and opportunity for them to move into more senior roles.

Unregistered 13-10-2015 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73713)
I believe he meant 100k base, excluding bonuses and potential equity. That translate into 8k+ monthly on a 12 month base package. That appears reasonable.

6k+ does appear on the low end, but let's keep in mind there are many at this level who are aspiring specialists (eg. Junior HRBPs or AVP equivalent in a bank?), and it'll take time, experience and opportunity for them to move into more senior roles.

the key word here is "aspiring specialist". anyone can claim to aspire to be anything, but until u actually reach that level, dun go ard claiming & acting like ur already there. flipping b/w 6-8k is arguing for arguing, either way its not near anything resembling "specialist"

Unregistered 14-10-2015 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MJDaisy (Post 73650)
Generalist =/= Specialist

8 years of Generalist work doesn't mean you are trained in benchmarking market salaries or building salary structures or doing job grading.

Read SOXA's and my replies. :)


This forum actually opened my eyes to the hr field. Used to think hr was purely an admin job.

If that's the case, how do you end up with a career in the specialist field? What would be a good career path to embark on upon graduation? Since I'm quite fresh on all these, some advice from all you experienced ppl would be greatly appreciated! :)

Unregistered 14-10-2015 07:21 PM

Hi guys... just wanted to get some advice and what I should expect in the HR industry.

Read quite a number of pages from this thread and I get a rough idea already.. but I would like to know what I can expect in my scenario.

Currently a Year 2 male student at NUS Business School and deciding whether to specialise in "Management & Human Capital" specialisation.. a.k.a HR? Assuming graduate with honours 2nd upper/ 2nd lower.

What kind of job/career progression can I expect? I read about the generalist/specialist paths and I guess I will start off by doing generalist work? then hopefully branch into specialist type of job after many years of work experience as a generalist?

What kind of starting salary can I hope to get as a fresh graduate and my career progression in terms of pay? And is it an unspoken thing that HR is dominated by females and hence males are at a slight disadvantage? hahah I don't think so right?

Thanks to all HR friends and seniors :)

MJDaisy 15-10-2015 12:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73713)
I believe he meant 100k base, excluding bonuses and potential equity. That translate into 8k+ monthly on a 12 month base package. That appears reasonable.

6k+ does appear on the low end, but let's keep in mind there are many at this level who are aspiring specialists (eg. Junior HRBPs or AVP equivalent in a bank?), and it'll take time, experience and opportunity for them to move into more senior roles.

Yes, I meant basic. So about 7.7k if it's 13 months.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unregistered (Post 73714)
the key word here is "aspiring specialist". anyone can claim to aspire to be anything, but until u actually reach that level, dun go ard claiming & acting like ur already there. flipping b/w 6-8k is arguing for arguing, either way its not near anything resembling "specialist"

"Aspiring" is a keyword, but I think we meant it in the way that the individual is on the path towards becoming a specialist, meaning that they have built up a fair bit of knowledge and experience, compared to a HR Payroll "Specialist" who do not have any knowledge of L&D for example.

I haven't read most of the posts before some of us began to really talk about the definition of the 'specialist' jobscope. I personally am not even in the salary range you mentioned, but I had the good opportunity to be exposed to HR early in my career. I have always been doing C&B since I started work, so I would thought that seeing salaries and benchmarking job grades on a daily basis for about 3 years would allow me a deeper understanding of HR jobs, compared to people in other HR functions.

And while we are still on the numbers... ://.hays.com.sg/cs/groups/hays_common/@hk/@content/documents/digitalasset/hays_246460.pdf
Please take a look at page 69 and 70.
Hays market survey 2015 shows that L&D manager (5+ years exp) gets the range of 80-140, and C&B Specialist (3+ years exp) gets 80-120k.
If you want to argue that the "specialist" title is overblown, even a Regional C&B Manager (10+ years) gets 150-180k.

These numbers are indicative of total package value, including benefits, bonuses, shares etc.

I mean, I would take Hays as a pretty reliable datahouse....

I'm not trying to be rude, but could you share about your jobscope (since you sound like you are a HR professional as well) and how did you get 200k as a benchmark for a HR specialist? I am genuinely curious. :)


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