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Today 02:51 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Why didn't you join the AGC?
I didnt get good honours on my degree + there was a hiring freeze and a queue to join AGC during the time that I decided to join the public service. Joining the AGC was not on my radar before that. I've probably gone too far down the wrong track for such regrets now.
Today 02:41 PM
Unregistered Why didn't you join the AGC?
Today 02:17 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Mind sharing what you're doing now?
A generic government job that any grad (even those who did some hippie crap like gender studies) could qualify for.
Today 02:15 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
BD roles focus on driving business growth and mainly fall into two categories: partnerships (sales) and expansion opportunities (which needs a lot of skills on data and statistics). It is good if you have such skills but many hirers apparently are not too concerned if you have the relevant background when youíre starting out at a junior level. This is because most skills such as CRM specific exp are taught when youíre on the job.
This is also why the earlier you quit the better. At the entry level position, hirers arenít extremely particular if you donít have the specific CRM skills. The pay for entry level BD is about 3.5-5k depending on the organization. Most people become executives in a few years and they can easily hit the 7-9k region. So if you want to earn about the same kind of salary as your law peers once you hit 30, quit law now and start early so you have plenty of time climb up to the executive positions and learn from the role.
Today 02:06 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I got called and never held a PC. I earn an extremely low salary now.

That said, I have friends who have done very well for themselves with ineligible law degrees (recognised uni, grade too low) as in house counsel. I'm not sure why I failed to land any such roles despite being called but the lesson and answer to your question is, it doesn't really matter.
Mind sharing what you're doing now?
Today 02:00 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
The answer above about "life experience" and "it depends" is a bad one. It really doesn't work that way.

When thinking about career moves, you should always think about it from the hirer's perspective. What value proposition do you bring to my org as a lawyer with 1-3 years of experience? I will give you an example. Say you are a M&A lawyer. A really good one. After 3 years, you decide you want to switch out and become a BD manager. You apply to my org. Do your 3 years of M&A experience mean anything? Straightforward answer: No. Even if I were to be planning an upcoming merger, something right up your alley, (1) it's not your job to handle the merger, and (2) if I really needed legal advice, I would consult my law firm. Not my BD manager.

Of course the situation is different if you are inhouse counsel, but we're discussing the case where one applies to a non-law related role.

Then the common response at this point is: "What about the soft skills that you have as a lawyer communication writing analytical skills bla bla bla". My answer is: Sure. You have that. But you're also expensive. If you're coming in as a 3PQE, will you accept a pay that's equivalent to a fresh grad? Probably not. But that's your value to me right now because you have no experience in the field. And fresh grads can also have those small skills. Even if you are willing to accept that, wouldn't I rather hire a fresh business graduate who already has some notion of business concepts from a degree that is somewhat related to the field?

In short, the longer you stay in law, the harder it is to get hired in a non-law field. Simple as that. If you wanna get out, get out earlier. This is anecdotal as well, have many friends who experienced the same. The most common way of pivoting out is apply to a good school, do a MBA. Then you can restart your career.
Iím not the OP but to summarize the posterís point - get out of law while youíre still a fresh grad. The longer you stay the harder it is to bridge the relevant experience and justify the career change. To many of you who thinking of quitting due to the current situation of the industry, my advice to you is, think carefully about the skills you have acquired from law school and your training. They can be applicable to the new role which you are applying to in many ways. You are still in a privileged position to quit the industry if you just got called.

Like many others, I didnít quit law mainly because I could not accept a pay that is significantly lower than what I am earning. Unfortunately many of my peers share the same sentiment. If I were in that fresh grad position I would love to go into a new career altogether and I am confident the pay I would have in that MNC would be equal or marginally less than my current pay.
Today 01:39 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I got called and never held a PC. I earn an extremely low salary now.

That said, I have friends who have done very well for themselves with ineligible law degrees (recognised uni, grade too low) as in house counsel. I'm not sure why I failed to land any such roles despite being called but the lesson and answer to your question is, it doesn't really matter.
You don't need a PC to be in house counsel in Singapore.

There are a lot of factors that go into "success". Where you went to uni and your degree class are important factors, but not determinative.
Today 01:36 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
For those interested in branching out of the legal industry to completely unrelated areas, is there any advantage to practising law for say, between 1 to 3 years, before moving out?

Quite apart from the fact that one who decides not to remain in the legal industry after one's PTC ends cannot be truly said to have practised law, arguably there a former practising lawyer would bring along certain perspectives/insights/qualities that would appeal to organisations, even if his/her substantive knowledge might not be applicable?
The answer above about "life experience" and "it depends" is a bad one. It really doesn't work that way.

When thinking about career moves, you should always think about it from the hirer's perspective. What value proposition do you bring to my org as a lawyer with 1-3 years of experience? I will give you an example. Say you are a M&A lawyer. A really good one. After 3 years, you decide you want to switch out and become a BD manager. You apply to my org. Do your 3 years of M&A experience mean anything? Straightforward answer: No. Even if I were to be planning an upcoming merger, something right up your alley, (1) it's not your job to handle the merger, and (2) if I really needed legal advice, I would consult my law firm. Not my BD manager.

Of course the situation is different if you are inhouse counsel, but we're discussing the case where one applies to a non-law related role.

Then the common response at this point is: "What about the soft skills that you have as a lawyer communication writing analytical skills bla bla bla". My answer is: Sure. You have that. But you're also expensive. If you're coming in as a 3PQE, will you accept a pay that's equivalent to a fresh grad? Probably not. But that's your value to me right now because you have no experience in the field. And fresh grads can also have those small skills. Even if you are willing to accept that, wouldn't I rather hire a fresh business graduate who already has some notion of business concepts from a degree that is somewhat related to the field?

In short, the longer you stay in law, the harder it is to get hired in a non-law field. Simple as that. If you wanna get out, get out earlier. This is anecdotal as well, have many friends who experienced the same. The most common way of pivoting out is apply to a good school, do a MBA. Then you can restart your career.
Today 01:24 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I got called and never held a PC. I earn an extremely low salary now.

That said, I have friends who have done very well for themselves with ineligible law degrees (recognised uni, grade too low) as in house counsel. I'm not sure why I failed to land any such roles despite being called but the lesson and answer to your question is, it doesn't really matter.
I would have to agree that it doesnít really matter in the long run. But while youíre looking for jobs outside the industry, please read about the new roles as much as possible. Try to look at your CV and then point out the relevant skills you think can be applicable to the role. Everything can be repackaged. After you have done this and got the role, everything about law will be in the past and it wonít matter anymore. What matters is your performance in that role itself.
Today 01:15 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
For those interested in branching out of the legal industry to completely unrelated areas, is there any advantage to practising law for say, between 1 to 3 years, before moving out?

Quite apart from the fact that one who decides not to remain in the legal industry after one's PTC ends cannot be truly said to have practised law, arguably there a former practising lawyer would bring along certain perspectives/insights/qualities that would appeal to organisations, even if his/her substantive knowledge might not be applicable?
I got called and never held a PC. I earn an extremely low salary now.

That said, I have friends who have done very well for themselves with ineligible law degrees (recognised uni, grade too low) as in house counsel. I'm not sure why I failed to land any such roles despite being called but the lesson and answer to your question is, it doesn't really matter.
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