First Job: Is it Normal to Struggle? - Salary.sg Forums
Salary.sg Forums  

Go Back   Salary.sg Forums > The Salary.sg Discussion Forums: > Income and Jobs

Income and Jobs Discuss jobs, career options and of course salaries




First Job: Is it Normal to Struggle?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2014, 09:07 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Singapore
Posts: 3
FreshGradStruggles is on a distinguished road
Default First Job: Is it Normal to Struggle?

Hello ... I am fresh graduate from NUS, and around three months into my first job now. It is something I studied for, really like and the organisation is also one that I have always wanted. Pay is also decent, and colleagues are nice.

In short, I kinda lucked out there.

The issue here is, I feel that I am struggling and not performing. Though colleagues do teach me stuffs, I feel that I am just not keeping up - even for a fresh hire. I am in my third month, and I still am unsure of even miscellaneous matters such as who to CC and etc. Just last week I submitted a report to my direct supervisor, and he rewrote almost the whole thing. He was nice about it, but I felt so useless. It was not even a particularly difficult report to write.

I still really like what I do, and I reckon it may also be because of this very fact that I am so stressed out. I want to be seen as competent, but I do not think I am doing that well.

Is this normal? Is three months too short for me to think that there may be an issue with my capability? Are there fellow mates in their first jobs who have the same woes?

Please do share stories.

Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2014, 11:05 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default 250

huh. three months nia so stress for what. chill out lar! first job always normal to make mistakes. if never mistakes then something is wrong, seriously. ok to also ask questions. better ask now then later.

Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 04:47 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

mind sharing what your industry/role is?

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 10:20 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

i studied banking and finance and joined SCB when i graduated. Didn't have much problems setting in etc. I was a pretty fast learner and adapter. Nevertheless after that, I have joined other places where it was more difficult to fit in and cope etc.

My advise is to speak to your direct supervisor and get his frank advice or appraisal on how he finds your performance for the past 3 months, what you can do to improve etc. Example that report you did? Maybe read similar reports from other colleagues etc on the right way it should be written etc.

About who to CC etc, keep a notebook and just record for emails about X subject - cc who and who and who etc.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 10:28 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshGradStruggles View Post
Hello ... I am fresh graduate from NUS, and around three months into my first job now. It is something I studied for, really like and the organisation is also one that I have always wanted. Pay is also decent, and colleagues are nice.

In short, I kinda lucked out there.

The issue here is, I feel that I am struggling and not performing. Though colleagues do teach me stuffs, I feel that I am just not keeping up - even for a fresh hire. I am in my third month, and I still am unsure of even miscellaneous matters such as who to CC and etc. Just last week I submitted a report to my direct supervisor, and he rewrote almost the whole thing. He was nice about it, but I felt so useless. It was not even a particularly difficult report to write.

I still really like what I do, and I reckon it may also be because of this very fact that I am so stressed out. I want to be seen as competent, but I do not think I am doing that well.

Is this normal? Is three months too short for me to think that there may be an issue with my capability? Are there fellow mates in their first jobs who have the same woes?

Please do share stories.
You are fortunate to have such patient people around you.

From my personal experience, MNCs typically have a more structured hand-holding training for the first 4-6 weeks, thereafter you are expected to go it on your own. GLCs are less forgiving and a lot more is expected from a grad... training is minimal (1-2 weeks at most) and you are expected to learn on your own, be inquisitive, find your wan about. sink or swim is the mentality.

Honestly, not knowing rudimentary things like who to cc after 3 months is not good. you should figure it out in the first month.

Keep a notebook handy to jot things down. However don't hover around your colleagues or stick too closely cos you may irritate the hell out of them after being around for so long and still having to ask all kinds of questions.

If all else fails then just hang in there, not everyone can make it to management and this natural selection process is vital to other people's progression.

Cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 11:40 AM
QXP
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshGradStruggles View Post
Hello ... I am fresh graduate from NUS, and around three months into my first job now. It is something I studied for, really like and the organisation is also one that I have always wanted. Pay is also decent, and colleagues are nice.

In short, I kinda lucked out there.

The issue here is, I feel that I am struggling and not performing. Though colleagues do teach me stuffs, I feel that I am just not keeping up - even for a fresh hire. I am in my third month, and I still am unsure of even miscellaneous matters such as who to CC and etc. Just last week I submitted a report to my direct supervisor, and he rewrote almost the whole thing. He was nice about it, but I felt so useless. It was not even a particularly difficult report to write.

I still really like what I do, and I reckon it may also be because of this very fact that I am so stressed out. I want to be seen as competent, but I do not think I am doing that well.

Is this normal? Is three months too short for me to think that there may be an issue with my capability? Are there fellow mates in their first jobs who have the same woes?

Please do share stories.
I am a line manager and have experience managing several large teams before and have seen a couple of cases like you before.

As I see it, most likely you are having the issue is because you are typical exam smart (which explains your NUS degree) but little experience or competency beyond that. You are now venturing outside your comfort zone and basically your mind is still in a type of brain freeze trying to adapt and comprehend what the heck is going on.

In the working world, you have to play politics, manage customers, manage internal colleagues and all this manifest in the way you write email (eg who to CC who to BCC), how should you write your report, how to angle the thing to look bad to A and look good to B in order to promote you / your boss interest etc.

Some things you need to say it at the right place at the right time to the right people etc, otherwise nothing seems to get done. You are still figuring out how to do that. In terms of analytics and language skills, I assume you should have them since your studies should be good to get into NUS.

My advice for you is first thing calm down, listen more, observe more and talk and think less. You are in the jungle and you must spend the next few months knowing your surroundings first. Don't think of career progression, impressing people or even "doing the job well", all these are secondary. You must discern the actual landscape in the office first before you can figure out how the game is played.

The good thing is so far, your boss and colleagues are not nasty and remain professional. But a lot of times when you gain experience, you will realise things are not as simple as it looks on the surface. The smiling and ever helpful colleague could be the most dangerous one.

Make use of this good luck of a good office environment to spend a few months to observe what's going on - usually there is an undercurrent on how the game is played, don't do anything silly until you figure out who is powerful, who is not, who is really good, who is not, who is your ally or enemy, and how to work with all of them to get things done. Some will call this playing cynical politics, but in real life this is the way to survive, compete and climb the corporate ladder.
Reply With Quote

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 02:06 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default i second this

best advice you can get


Quote:
Originally Posted by QXP View Post
I am a line manager and have experience managing several large teams before and have seen a couple of cases like you before.

As I see it, most likely you are having the issue is because you are typical exam smart (which explains your NUS degree) but little experience or competency beyond that. You are now venturing outside your comfort zone and basically your mind is still in a type of brain freeze trying to adapt and comprehend what the heck is going on.

In the working world, you have to play politics, manage customers, manage internal colleagues and all this manifest in the way you write email (eg who to CC who to BCC), how should you write your report, how to angle the thing to look bad to A and look good to B in order to promote you / your boss interest etc.

Some things you need to say it at the right place at the right time to the right people etc, otherwise nothing seems to get done. You are still figuring out how to do that. In terms of analytics and language skills, I assume you should have them since your studies should be good to get into NUS.

My advice for you is first thing calm down, listen more, observe more and talk and think less. You are in the jungle and you must spend the next few months knowing your surroundings first. Don't think of career progression, impressing people or even "doing the job well", all these are secondary. You must discern the actual landscape in the office first before you can figure out how the game is played.

The good thing is so far, your boss and colleagues are not nasty and remain professional. But a lot of times when you gain experience, you will realise things are not as simple as it looks on the surface. The smiling and ever helpful colleague could be the most dangerous one.

Make use of this good luck of a good office environment to spend a few months to observe what's going on - usually there is an undercurrent on how the game is played, don't do anything silly until you figure out who is powerful, who is not, who is really good, who is not, who is your ally or enemy, and how to work with all of them to get things done. Some will call this playing cynical politics, but in real life this is the way to survive, compete and climb the corporate ladder.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 03:41 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by QXP View Post
I am a line manager and have experience managing several large teams before and have seen a couple of cases like you before.

As I see it, most likely you are having the issue is because you are typical exam smart (which explains your NUS degree) but little experience or competency beyond that. You are now venturing outside your comfort zone and basically your mind is still in a type of brain freeze trying to adapt and comprehend what the heck is going on.

In the working world, you have to play politics, manage customers, manage internal colleagues and all this manifest in the way you write email (eg who to CC who to BCC), how should you write your report, how to angle the thing to look bad to A and look good to B in order to promote you / your boss interest etc.

Some things you need to say it at the right place at the right time to the right people etc, otherwise nothing seems to get done. You are still figuring out how to do that. In terms of analytics and language skills, I assume you should have them since your studies should be good to get into NUS.

My advice for you is first thing calm down, listen more, observe more and talk and think less. You are in the jungle and you must spend the next few months knowing your surroundings first. Don't think of career progression, impressing people or even "doing the job well", all these are secondary. You must discern the actual landscape in the office first before you can figure out how the game is played.

The good thing is so far, your boss and colleagues are not nasty and remain professional. But a lot of times when you gain experience, you will realise things are not as simple as it looks on the surface. The smiling and ever helpful colleague could be the most dangerous one.

Make use of this good luck of a good office environment to spend a few months to observe what's going on - usually there is an undercurrent on how the game is played, don't do anything silly until you figure out who is powerful, who is not, who is really good, who is not, who is your ally or enemy, and how to work with all of them to get things done. Some will call this playing cynical politics, but in real life this is the way to survive, compete and climb the corporate ladder.
I don't play politics.
I remain kind to everyone.
In the working world, you need to learn how to make compromises even when things don't turn your way.
find ways to prove your worth to your company, not arguing over petty small project issues.
I feel completely at ease at work, I walk around like I own the bloody place.
I work hard when I want to.
I relax when I want to (not the fake take newspaper and pretend to read type), I completely stare in the blank and relax
I argue based on intelligence and work. not based on politics
I shout at you if you are unfair.
Always remember to have a kind heart, when you are kind, you automatically forget all the negativities from nasty people, and you still walk coolly and steadily in the office (no avoidance)
All these leads to confidence in the office.
Your directors will notice you are very comfortable and confident every day and they will chat you up.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 04:24 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by QXP View Post
I am a line manager and have experience managing several large teams before and have seen a couple of cases like you before.

As I see it, most likely you are having the issue is because you are typical exam smart (which explains your NUS degree) but little experience or competency beyond that. You are now venturing outside your comfort zone and basically your mind is still in a type of brain freeze trying to adapt and comprehend what the heck is going on.

In the working world, you have to play politics, manage customers, manage internal colleagues and all this manifest in the way you write email (eg who to CC who to BCC), how should you write your report, how to angle the thing to look bad to A and look good to B in order to promote you / your boss interest etc.

Some things you need to say it at the right place at the right time to the right people etc, otherwise nothing seems to get done. You are still figuring out how to do that. In terms of analytics and language skills, I assume you should have them since your studies should be good to get into NUS.

My advice for you is first thing calm down, listen more, observe more and talk and think less. You are in the jungle and you must spend the next few months knowing your surroundings first. Don't think of career progression, impressing people or even "doing the job well", all these are secondary. You must discern the actual landscape in the office first before you can figure out how the game is played.

The good thing is so far, your boss and colleagues are not nasty and remain professional. But a lot of times when you gain experience, you will realise things are not as simple as it looks on the surface. The smiling and ever helpful colleague could be the most dangerous one.

Make use of this good luck of a good office environment to spend a few months to observe what's going on - usually there is an undercurrent on how the game is played, don't do anything silly until you figure out who is powerful, who is not, who is really good, who is not, who is your ally or enemy, and how to work with all of them to get things done. Some will call this playing cynical politics, but in real life this is the way to survive, compete and climb the corporate ladder.
good rare post like this make me come back to this forum still...

thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2014, 04:42 PM
QXP
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I don't play politics.
I remain kind to everyone.
In the working world, you need to learn how to make compromises even when things don't turn your way.
find ways to prove your worth to your company, not arguing over petty small project issues.
I feel completely at ease at work, I walk around like I own the bloody place.
I work hard when I want to.
I relax when I want to (not the fake take newspaper and pretend to read type), I completely stare in the blank and relax
I argue based on intelligence and work. not based on politics
I shout at you if you are unfair.
Always remember to have a kind heart, when you are kind, you automatically forget all the negativities from nasty people, and you still walk coolly and steadily in the office (no avoidance)
All these leads to confidence in the office.
Your directors will notice you are very comfortable and confident every day and they will chat you up.
I'm not quite sure whether you were quoting me out of convinience or was the post directed at someone else because I can't see what you have said has got to do with FreshGradStruggles's (FGS) problem.

FGS is having difficulty figuring out email communication nuances, report writing and how to get things done in the office without relying on colleagues. You are presumably advocating him/her to follow your various unorthodox examples of completely staring in the blank and relax, shouting at others when it is unfair, "have a kind heart" and worse of all to walk cooly and steadily with the logic that somehow senior management will think that's confidence and chat you up.

I don't usually respond to this sort of juvenile nonsense, but seeing at how FGS is quite confused and lost in the workspace, I really need to step in and rebut this kind of misguidance which can cause career damage to the undiscerning.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

« Previous Thread | Next Thread »
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
is my civil service pay progression fast/slow/normal? miwashi Income and Jobs 105 20-03-2015 04:54 PM
is this a normal condition for an overseas internship? warning Income and Jobs 3 23-12-2014 08:17 AM
normal degree in stat board vs ministry hanszzz Income and Jobs 24 26-02-2012 02:40 AM

» 30 Recent Threads
Civil Service Performance Bonus ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
1,675 Replies, 1,373,900 Views
UOB Management Associate Program ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
286 Replies, 186,815 Views
Dsta ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
846 Replies, 583,308 Views
ST Electronics ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
1,059 Replies, 283,441 Views
MasterCard Graduate Developement... ( 1 2 3)
24 Replies, 7,017 Views
AML/Compliance/KYC professionals... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
1,407 Replies, 596,846 Views
How Much Do You Need to Earn... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
41 Replies, 18,821 Views
How is life as a doctor in... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
1,523 Replies, 1,005,399 Views
How much are you earning per annum? ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
12,111 Replies, 3,889,885 Views
Singtel Management Associate... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
128 Replies, 92,491 Views
Career as Teacher ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
2,962 Replies, 1,817,510 Views
Software developers salary outlier ( 1 2)
13 Replies, 2,812 Views
Work culture in CPF board ( 1 2 3)
23 Replies, 35,056 Views
DBS Graduate Associate Program ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
748 Replies, 383,372 Views
MINDEF DXO (All FAQ on it) ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
3,471 Replies, 2,052,853 Views
Civil Svc/ Statboard - Typical... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
2,803 Replies, 1,182,869 Views
Singapore LNG Pay
4 Replies, 1,403 Views
Ex-MOE Teachers ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
85 Replies, 123,647 Views
Lawyer Salary ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
9,734 Replies, 3,180,089 Views
Compare civil service salary ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
10,916 Replies, 6,035,648 Views
Pay grade at CSA ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
150 Replies, 40,193 Views
Q: Big4 - Yearly salary increment ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
1,055 Replies, 835,840 Views
Any Kaplan students here can land... ( 1 2)
15 Replies, 2,306 Views
Part-time Higher NITEC in...
2 Replies, 1,966 Views
Allied educator scheme
2 Replies, 708 Views
Anyone jobless for a long time... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
3,017 Replies, 1,161,159 Views
Advantages
3 Replies, 1,337 Views
DBS tech seed programme ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
168 Replies, 18,144 Views
Credit Suisse - IB Academy
0 Replies, 117 Views
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2



All times are GMT +8. The time now is 11:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2